What Is Hydration? And How Much Fluid And Hydration For Optimal Performance

Learn about hydration and its importance to the body. We will look at the facts and the benefits of hydration. There is a short quiz to take at the end of the lesson to check your knowledge.

What Is Hydration

What Is Hydration? And How Much Fluid And Hydration For Optimal Performance

What Is Hydration? And How Much Fluid And Hydration For Optimal Performance

Ever felt thirsty that when you drank some water then it had been the best thing you ever had to drink on your lifetime? You just couldn’t get enough water. This is likely as a result of you being dried, meaning your own body is in a state of never having enough water for it to work optimally. Signs that you are dehydrated include stomach cramps, confusion, rapid pulse, and also headaches. As a way to get your system back into its normal state, you had to go through the process of substituting the lost hydration or water. 1 way to understand that you are no longer dehydrated, is that the symptoms of dehydration will evaporate rather promptly.

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Fluid and Hydration For Optimal Performance

Actuely aware of the health and performance effect of dehydration, health, and fitness expert has long warned recreational exercise enthusiasts and athlete alike to hydrate continuously. But the latest research reveals that hyponatremia- or severely reduced blood sodium concentration resulting from overhydration- may be of equal or greater concern than dehydration. ACSM and the united state track the field association (USATF) have developed guidelines for optimal guidelines for optimal hydration during exercise. people should also adhere to the following guidelines(casa, Clarkson, &Roberts, 2005) :

7 Simple Hydration Tips For Athlete

What Is Hydration? And How Much Fluid And Hydration For Optimal Performance

What Is Hydration? And How Much Fluid And Hydration For Optimal Performance

  1. use thirst to determine fluid needs: advice to drink water when they are thirsty and stop when they feel hydrated.
  2. Aim for a 1:1 ratio fluid replacement to fluid lost in sweat: ideally, people should consume the same amount of fluid ass is lost in sweat. The exerciser can compare pre- and post-exercise body weight. perfect hydration occurs when no weight is lost or gain during exercise. Because people sweat at varying rates, the typical recommendation to consume 3-6 ounce of water every 20 minutes of exercise may not be appropriate for everyone. However,  when the individual assessment is not possible, this recommendation work for most people. Expert advises slightly less for slower, a smaller athlete in mid environment conditions and slightly more for competitive athlete working at higher intensities in a warmer environment.
  3. Measure fluid amounts: when exerciser know that how much they are actually drinking, they may be able to better asses if they are consuming appropriate amounts.
  4.  Drink Fluid with sodium during prolonged exercise sessions: if an exercise session lasts longer than 2 hours or an athlete is a participating in an event that stimulates heavy sodium loss(defined as more than 3 to 4 gram of sodium), expert recommend that the athlete take a sports drink that contains an elevated level of sodium (Coyle, 2004). Note researcher did not find a benefit from sports drinks that contain only the 18mmol/L (100mg/8oz) of sodium typically of most sports drinks and thus concluded that higher levels would be needed to prevent hyponatremia during prolonged exercise. Alternatively, exercisers can consume extra sodium with meals and snacks prior to a lengthy exercise session or a day of extensive physical activity (Casa, 2003).
  5. Drink carbohydrate-containing sports drinks to reduce fatigue: With prolonged exercise, muscle glycogen stores become depleted and blood glucose becomes a primary fuel source. To maintain performance levels and prevent fatigue, consume drinks and snacks that provide about 30 to 60 g of rapidly absorbed carbohydrate for every hour of training (Coyle, 2004). As long as the carbohydrate concentration is less than about 6 to 800, it will have little effect on gastric emptying (Coombes 8C Hamilton, 2000).
  6. Hydrate appropriately pre and post-event: To maximize pre-event hydration, USATF recommends consuming 17 to 20 ounces of water or sports drink two to three hours before exercise and 10 to 12 ounces of water or sports drink within 10 minutes of beginning exercise. Following exercise, the athlete should aim to correct any fluid imbalances that occurred during the exercise session. This includes consuming water to restore hydration, carbohydrates to replenish glycogen stores, and electrolytes to speed rehydration (Casa, 2003). Those at greatest risk of hyponatremia should be careful not to consume too much water following exercise and instead should focus on replenishing sodium.
  7. Pay attention to environmental conditions: Athletes Who are Well-acclimatized to heat Will have decreased sodium losses in sweat, which lowers their risk of hyponatremia (Casa, 2003). Risk of heat stroke is elevated in conditions of elevated temperature and humidity and little or no wind due to the diminished ability of the body to dissipate heat into the environment (Noakes, 2003).

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The human body is well-equipped to withstand dramatic variations in fluid intake during exercise and at rest with little or no detrimental health effects. For this reason, most recreational exercisers will never suffer from serious hyponatremia 0r dehydration and should not be alarmed. It is under extreme situations of prolonged or very high-intensity exercise in excessive heat and humidity that risk elevates. And even then, if athletes replenish sweat loss With equal amounts of fluid. hydration problems can be avoided.

How Much Water Is Enough?

What Is Hydration? And How Much Fluid And Hydration For Optimal Performance

What Is Hydration? And How Much Fluid And Hydration For Optimal Performance

Contrary to popular belief, there isn’t a set quantity of water which everyone should drink in a particular period of time. The amount it can take to hydrate 1 person is different in the sum that it would take to hydrate someone else. Factors that determine how much water we should drink contain body composition, activity level, and the total amount of water lost through sweating and breathing.

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